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a pre-tax profit margin of 17. %, she said she would revisit those goals for the pretax profit margins for that unit in mid year once, again, the final acquisition or the last leg of that brokerage unit has been completed. the year over year decline in fixed income commodities and currency trading was down 42%. she said it was due to the very strong first quarter of 2012. that was due to some hejs that had helped put on for its clients. however, she did note on a quarter over quarter basis trading was up. retail activity among the brokerage clients was strong in january and february. it did taper off a little bit in march on concerns about some of the issues we saw. cyprus the big run-up in the market, et cetera. april got off to a slightly stronger start as well. she said ceo confidence when it comes to m and a, she said right now ceos are looking out to the second half of the year. there is concerns about the profit outlook there and that's holding them back a little bit. debt and equity underwriting remain strong. >> thank you, mary. a lot of information you had from that conversati
the figures look like. w new york state, where cutting taxes for families and businesses is our business. we've reduced taxes and lowered costs to save businesses more than two billion dollars to grow jobs, cut middle class income taxes to the lowest rate in sixty years, and we're creating tax free zones for business startups. the new new york is working creating tens of thousands of new businesses, and we're just getting started. to grow or start your business visit thenewny.com >>> welcome back to cnbc. disappointing figures out of germany keep market gains in check with investorers concerned about weaker than expected data in china. a mixed set of numbers in europe with kpm disappointing, but more positive earnings from escona. apple is getting set to report much anticipated results around noon. analysts get set for a shrink for the first time in aek did aid. >> your data alert out of britain, that compare bes a 15.5 billion establishment and $16.7 billion a year ago. as britain's finances come more and more into focus, the question then becomes what these levels will continue to look lik
new york state, where cutting taxes for families and businesses is our business. we've reduced taxes and lowered costs to save businesses more than two billion dollars to grow jobs, cut middle class income taxes to the lowest rate in sixty years, and we're creating tax free zones for business startups. the new new york is working creating tens of thousands of new businesses, and we're just getting started. to grow or start your business visit thenewny.com >>> on budget and on time, rio tinto says it's on track to expand iron ore output to 390 million tons this year under its $90 million project. the company is making good progress in its cost cutting drive, coping with the sharp fall in commodity demand. shares are higher this morning 1.74%. i want to get a thought here from martin hennecke. martin, what do you do with iron ore here despite the declines we've seen across the board for the commodity complex? >> it's a great time to manipulate because it has been monolithic growth on those metals and you see the physical buyers really moving in very strongly, for example, in china ther
and that they are squeezed to higher payroll taxes. me? i come down squarely in the mechanical camp, because i have liquidated assets myself. i know the havoc that a margin clerk can wreak, because i have been there and been a part of it and perhaps because i am a recipient of a tough margin call and because i know how the raise capital on the fly, and how hedge funds gone wild exacerbated the 2008 and 2009 sell-off with endless liquidations, and i have seen the pattern before and it is similar to all of the other times and it does not mean that it should be longer, but or when the margin clerks are done, but it should sold, because you have little basis of facts. what should you do? first, if you find out no mystery and world wide weakness, take the sell-off from face value and find out who benefits? the answer is companies like general mills, boxes filled with grains that are declining in price. and general mills benefits from the commodities decline all of the way around. so if you believe that there is a worldwide slip for commodities to decline, then gis. and this is the exaggerating the short
to rest. we'll check in on the church services. we've reduced taxes and lowered costs to save businesses more than two billion dollars to grow jobs, cut middle class income taxes to the lowest rate in sixty years, and we're creating tax free zones for business startups. the new new york is working creating tens of thousands of new businesses, and we're just getting started. to grow or start your business visit thenewny.com ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> a second wave of people who live near the site of the massive explosion at a fertilizer plant in the town of west, texas were allowed to return home today. residents who were lucky enough to still have homes began returning yesterday. wednesday's explosion flattened the north side of the small farming town heavily damaging a nursing home, schools and neighborhoods. new evidence in the investigation is now surfacing and cnn's miguel marquez has that. mi miguel? >> reporter: don, for the first time we are hearing the 911 tape
is not growing and getting a little weaker with the higher taxes, but, you know, and i also like netflix. i like amazon. i like sales force. i like companies that they actually are creating demand because they're new leading edge products. yes they have a very high p-e. so does sales force. so does amazon. but they're generate, they at tracking new revenues from new businesses that didn't exist before. netflix is a great example. david: one. hits against apple right now, which you are recommending. and this is to michael. they haven't come out with a new product line. they have been sort of revising some old models. does that concern you? are you still for apple even though the new products don't seem to be anywhere to be seen? >> i would agree with you, in the past couple quarters we haven't seen anything compelling coming out. but i think that is going to change. i think we heard a lot about an i-watch. i think we heard about itv. we heard about a new ipad coming out. we'll get something not a complete makeover but a new iphone. i believe the product seitel will -- cycle will get much better n
at $400 a share. it's got more than $100 net cash even after paying taxes, so you're paying $3,000, any earnings down 25% from what's expected. he put a ten p-e on that and this is a very cheap stock unless you believe that earnings will decline every year from here on out. that's ahead of the case and we're not buying ahead of it because we like the position that we have, you know, but we think it's an exceptionally cheap stock at this level. >> it will be one of the most-watched numbers of the quarter. thanks so much. >> thank you. >> switching gears, they were grossly negligent in the lead up to the brokerage firm's collapse. kayla tausche has more on this story which she's been following from its earlier days. >> it seems like it's been forever, david. we're getting a 61-page lawsuit from the bankruptcy court in manhattan. it takes aim at john corzine and the coo and cfo breaching fiduciary duty as it entered a downward spiral in 2011. it seeks an unspecified amount in damages. trustees won approval for a liquidation plan. in a statement, trustee louis freeh says attempts at med med
in the 35 to 40% -- >> that's still way too high. mortgages are a great bargain under the tax code. >> it's extraordinary. >> are they going to get rid of the deduction? >> i don't think so. it by far impacts middle america more than anyone else. if they tweak it, it will be on the edge. but listen, mortgage interest deduction has been around over 100 years. i don't believe it's going anywhere. >> demand outstripping supply in your last conference call. you said that. even better now? >> it is. >> is there a housing shortage, sir? >> absolutely. >> there is? >> it's worse than any of us imagined. >> what states? >> let's look at new york city as an example. there are money venturi -- >> people are knocking on people's doors who do not have signs. i'm not kidding. >> i know. i know that to be the -- we tell them to do it. they're literally trying to convince you to sell. now, the seller's got to convince themselves that they can actually get the price they want. and that is starting to change. i mean, you're seeing extraordinary price increases. we have markets where prices are increasing
caused more issues. it may be the sequester or the payroll tax, and it is always something. first quarter strong. bond yields will go way up and then -- >> no m & a. i can't break the cycle. it's not my job. 18 straight months of re numbers in europe. there are car sales down 15, 16, our car sales 15 million, okay? their housing starts and did they start any housing there? are we not -- >> we are a different place. >> what about we've had some pretty crumby data. we've had an explosion in boston. we've had cyprus and the vix is still at 14. converge extries to argue that the market's on am bi18 and it can't feel what's going on in the world right now. >> i thought it was seroquil. there is the market that just says kimberly is going to report, and i think kimberly is going to be decent and its stock's at par and then there's caterpillar they made their bed with china. china has not been able to stimulate. 25% of china's exports go to europe. there's no room in europe unless china sets up the buy program of all of the things they make in china and then destroys them in the 1930s in our cou
. you've heard that the first quarter was tough. probably payroll tax impacted more than anything else. and small business is -- and big business for that matter is totally the flux with the obama care act and what it all means. and business is looking at part-time, that you've got to keep people under 30 hours. they don't want to employ more than 50 people. and nobody really knows how this thing is going to work. now, as far as the japanese yen, every major manufacturer in the world has made a strategic decision to produce where they sell. no manufacturer can deal with the volatility in exchange rates. and if you look at where the japanese are today compared to 10, 20 years ago, there is no comparison with let's say 80% produced in north america. so the exchange rate has been dramatically reduced as a factor in our business. and at the moment, i don't see any impact. >> okay, mike, $42. we've been friends a long time. you couldn't tell me at four bucks that that was something i should -- actually, we're not allowed to do it, anyway, but you couldn't have mentioned that back in 2008 or
to have the same enthusiasm for paying taxes for the education of its college students today than it had during the cold war. >> anybody else? back in the red shirt in the middle here. >> one of the kingpins of hollywood, more behind the seasons, was lou wasserman who seemed to helped his forces to some political efforts. what was his leanings? was he considered to be a lefty, righty, or just a pragmatist. >> the question is about lou wasserman and his political lengs. -- political leanings. richard? >> lou was seniorman was essentially a man defeated to the welfare of universal pictures. that's what he did and how he defined himself. it seems to me that wasserman was in a certain sense value neutral so long as whatever was happening worked to the benefit of his studio and his enterprise, and it was a vast enterprise by the time it was -- it reached full maturity. i don't think he was -- i don't think he was evil man. he was just a guy really tending to business in a very, very, i must say, very effective way. there's no question in my mind at least, that he was the weeding ontrip -- the
flooding. we'll have a live report from hard-hit illinois coming up next. we've reduced taxes and lowered costs to save businesses more than two billion dollars to grow jobs, cut middle class income taxes to the lowest rate in sixty years, and we're creating tax free zones for business startups. the new new york is working creating tens of thousands of new businesses, and we're just getting started. to grow or start your business visit thenewny.com ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. has oats t
the last couple of months. >> there are good articles in the papers today about how the tax receipts were better than expected so far, and the money back out for your refund, much lower than expected and that could be a dollar issue. i know family dollar flagged that, and the ceo of pvh came on "mad money" and said, it was 20 degrees too cold so we had the -- all of the stores had the wrong merchandise and they had the so-called cruisewear. it was obviously a multi-factor issue and it was not just one thing that says target was bad. walmart was not bad and a very good note. costco, and i'm -- i thought that was interesting. surrounded by costco and walmart. you know those cultures are not weather cultures. >> yeah. ubs initiates with a buy on those two and a neutral on target, but someone pointed out the sales trend on target, jim, from the past four quarters has gone from 5-3, 2-9, .4 and now they're looking flat. >> they're not a jc penney beneficiary and walmart is not very renewed in its tenacious way to take on target and underneath the dollar generals. i know people don't associate
'll see this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. you know who is coming on to me now? you know the kind of guys that do reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all the time now. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's what you're saying. you would rather deal with ahmadinejad than me. >>absolutely. >> and so would mitt romney. (vo) she's joy behar. >>and the best part is that current will let me say anything. what the hell were (vo) this afternoon, current tv is the place for compelling true stories. >> jack, how old are you? >> nine. >> this is what 27 tons of marijuana looks like. (vo) with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines, way inside. (vo) from the underworld, to the wor
chance we'll see this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. >> like some sort of genius. >> yes, except for the genius part. >> stephanie: it is the "the stephanie miller show." 34 -- okay minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-12. [ laughter ] >> wow. >> stephanie: when did you put that help ticket in? >> wednesday. >> 1972. >> stephanie: okay. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free from anywhere. looky who's back in town. ♪ ♪ pundit ♪ ♪ papa, papa, papa who ♪ >> >> stephanie: thank god you picked a slow news week. >> go to berlin. >> it was so nice not to be there to watch the freakout. >> stephanie: the arkansas lawmaker mocks boston liberal says they wish they had assault rifles. if there has ever been an example on the expertise of law enforcement, it was boston, right? >> right. it was exactly what they
. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can see it on yours, the program has exploded with companies advertising free phones, many of which come with more than 250 minutes of time, far more than needed for emergencies obviously. those supporters argue some need phones to find a job but the fcc told congress the top five providers can not verify the eligibility of 41% of those who get the phones. listen. >> i hear from law enforcement that these phones are often found at crime scenes and are used in drug deals. why? because you can't trace them. >> just handing out phones willy-nilly and allowing them to be sold on the black market, this isn't the way to do it and we need to stop. >> reporter: now some recipients famously called them obama phones. there is one supporter who boasted to media during the election that all minorities should support the president because he gave them free cell phones. some now propose expanding the free phone service to broadband but mccaskill says the current program is so far out of control we should scrap it and start over, not expand it.
't been up front with my taxes. this would prevent d.h.s. from say sharing that information with the internal revenue service? guest: the private companies in sharing information, the biggest concern is -- individuals are concerned that their private information within the cyber networks or systems would be held by private companies but then provided to the government, that this private information would not be stripped by the companies first. in the president's executive order, the onus would be on the privacy advocates. companiesthe private to strip any private information that might be caught up within the context of cyber threat information. first one has to understand the definition of cyber threat. it is unlikely but not impossible that your private tax information, your e-mail content would be part of that information that is a cyber threat information that would be given to the government. is there a possibility that it would be lumped in with that? yes. so whose responsibility is it to minimize and get rid of your private information? the bill does not allow the gov
joins us next with more on that. we're learning more about the bombs used in at that time tax. we'll ask a former crime scene analyst what these devices can tell us. >> we're going to get the victims out. we're then going to conduct a sweep with dod. make sure there are no other devices on the street. then we need to get people out of the restaurants and bars. we need somebody on social media okay, team! after age 40, we can start losing muscle -- 8% every 10 years. wow. wow. but you can help fight muscle loss with exercise and ensure muscle health. i've got revigor. what's revigor? it's the amino acid metabolite, hmb to help rebuild muscle and strength naturally lost over time. [ female announcer ] ensure muscle health has revigor and protein to help protect, preserve, and promote muscle health. keeps you from getting soft. [ major nutrition ] ensure. nutrition in charge! [ female announcer ] from more efficient payments. ♪ to more efficient pick-ups. ♪ wireless is limitless. ♪ from tracking the bus. ♪ to tracking field conditions. ♪ wireless is limitless. to. bill: back here
remarkably, we saw it on monday when we had axelrod say the ready things it could be related to tax day. it reminds me of someone, bloomberg saying it could be -- look, we have had this political correctness where we are not allows to see, peter king had hearings on homeland security on homegrown terrorism and three was attacked and i was involved in a poll, 3-1 said we should do something. the problem is the f.b.i., they missed the story. they still coughing up benghazi as they did 40 years ago with watergate. it all points to the same: everything we said has been ignoring whether ft. hood or domestic workplace violence, that is crap. we are dealing with homegrown islamic extremists and we better get used to dealing with it for real. >>gregg: the president said al qaeda is on the run, whether these guys are radicalized abroad or homegrown there is a connection to radicalism. >> for all three of us, we would say that the president did a marvelous job on thursday and from the minute the bombing happened, the police and the f.b.i. were fantastic to identify these guys in 72 hours --. egg
the last four months and even years before that debating issues like taxes, spending, and health care, but the number-one responsibility of the federal government is to keep the american people safe and secure. our response to this attack must be firm and unequivocal. we must send a clear message that we will never compromise our value or our freedom in the face of terrorist violence. we must stay on the offensive against the enemies of civilization and remain vigilant in our day-to-day lives. the victims of boston deserve nothing less. madam president, i yield the floor. and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from iowa. mr. grassley: i ask that the calling of the quorum be suspended. the presiding officer: without objection. under the previous order, the senate will resume consideration of s. 649, which the clerk will report. the clerk: s. 649, a bill to ensure that all individuals who should be prohibited from buying a firearm are listed in the national inst
're paying too much tax. i'm going to fix that. >> stephanie: baseball card in the spokes. >> rat tat tat tat, tat. >> stephanie: that's an oldy but a goody. he used to like to ride his bike so much. until he ran over the scottish policeman, one of our other favorite stories. >> broke his foot. >> stephanie: because he rides like a [ bleep ] hole, same way he governs. >> you know how awful a broken foot is. >> stephanie: right! okay. anyway, he said he's glad his paintings are confounding his critics. people are surprised. some people are surprised i can even read. yes, that's true. >> computer says yes! >> stephanie: anyway. >> sure couldn't read national security action. >> stephanie: he might have read it before he barbecued it at the ranch. >> we're out of napkins. where is that memo? >> not a lot of ranching was going on. >> stephanie: brush clearing. where do we find more brush for this idiot to clear? really? is there anymore brush? it is busy work. >> airlift some brush. drop it on the ranch. >> stephanie: pam in new hampshire, you're on "the stephanie miller show." hey, pam. >> calle
. and then asa to close it off. >> yes, thank you, jim. the tax force says -- the task force says in our report all societies behave differently under stress. at those times they may even take actions that conflict with their essential character and values. and that's what we did here. of we were under stress, and we took actions that conflict with who we are. who we are called to be and who we have committed to be. and then we spent about ten years not being willing to face the truth about that. often by covering what happened with euphemisms and an awful lot of state secrets. so i believe that our detainee task force has functioned as a kind of truth commission, revealing where we strayed from our values by shining the light of investigation and analysis onto the problem in the open that the next time we're under that kind of stress we do not go down the same road. and it has been an honor to serve on this panel. >> thank you, dave. nick? >> very little, just in terms of new things, everyone here has discussed the general contours of the report which is the most important thing. there are som
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)